fbpx
Sat. Apr 13th, 2024

A study demonstrates paracetamol may impact the liver

Researchers issued a warning, stating that patients who abuse the drug could have serious negative effects.

Paracetamol is among the most dependable drugs for pain relief. These pills offer hassle-free, instant comfort that has long been demonstrated to be beneficial. Experts have warned individuals who regularly use paracetamol about serious health concerns, though.

In a recent study, a group at the University of Edinburgh assessed the medication’s effects on mice and concluded that it harms live organisms.

The scientists speculate that the outcome could direct future research into remedies meant to counteract the adverse effects of the medication.

In depth

Scientists issued a warning, stating that patients who abuse the drug could have serious negative effects. Four gms of paracetamol a day is the usual dosage for people with chronic pain.

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh examined how paracetamol affected liver cells in both human and mouse tissue. Their findings indicated that under some circumstances, paracetamol can injure the liver by interfering with the structural connections that are essential for the proper functioning of adjacent cells in the liver.

According to study conducted by experts at the University of Edinburgh on the effects of the medication on liver cells in human and mouse tissue, “paracetamol” can harm the liver in some circumstances by destroying important structural connections between adjacent cells in the organ. The damage is brought on by these tight junctions, which are connectors in the cell wall.

Take away

This study is the first to link paracetamol toxicity to liver damage, such as that seen in conditions like cancer, cirrhosis, and hepatitis.

Researchers from the Universities of Edinburgh and Oslo, as well as the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service, participated in the study.

It was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

By Parvathy Sukumaran

Parvathy Sukumaran is a Content Creator and Editor at JustCare Health. She is an Educator and a Language Lecturer. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in Education and an M.A in English Literature. She is passionate about writing, archaeology, music and cooking.

Related Post

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial
error

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)