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Sat. May 18th, 2024

Daily exercise of just 20 to 25 minutes may reduce the risk of death from extended sitting

People's risk of dying reduces more the more they exercise.

Contrary to popular belief, a recent study indicates that much less exercise can lower a person’s risk of death. The study discovers that a sedentary lifestyle can lower one’s chance of dying young by as much as 22 minutes per day of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

Naturally, the benefits of exercise are dose-dependent, meaning that, up to a certain degree, the more activity, the lower the risk of mortality.

People’s risk of dying reduces more the more they exercise. The results of the study demonstrate that regular exercise can be done in one sitting or in smaller bursts during the day.

Study

The higher risk of death linked to a sedentary lifestyle can be eliminated with about 22 minutes of moderate to intense physical activity every day, according to a recent study.

11,989 participants in multiple fitness-tracker studies—the Swedish Healthy Ageing Initiative, the Norwegian National Physical Activity Survey, the Norwegian Tromso Study, and the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey—were monitored by the study’s authors.

Every participant in the studies, who was at least fifty years old, gave the researchers information about their height, weight, sex, education, alcohol and smoking habits, and history of diabetes, heart disease, or cancer.

Out of the participants, 6,042 spent at least 10.5 hours a day on a chair, whereas 5,943 spent less than that amount each day. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the impact of physical activity and inactive time on mortality risk as determined by death registries.

If an individual does not exercise for more than 22 minutes per day, sitting for more than 12 hours per day is linked to a 38% higher risk of death than sitting for 8 hours.

Every participant in the studies, who was at least fifty years old, gave the researchers information about their height, weight, sex, education, alcohol and smoking habits, and history of diabetes, heart disease, or cancer.

Result

Out of the participants, 6,042 spent at least 10.5 hours a day on a chair, whereas 5,943 spent less than that amount each day. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the impact of physical activity and inactive time on mortality risk as determined by death registries.

If an individual does not exercise for more than 22 minutes per day, sitting for more than 12 hours per day is linked to a 38% higher risk of death than sitting for 8 hours.

Dr. Sagelv emphasised that the study’s 22 minutes of daily physical exercise equates to the 150 minutes that the WHO recommends.

According to the study, there was no correlation between increased inactive time and a higher risk of death for those who engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical exercise for more than 22 minutes each day. This goes against the suggestion made by the WHO to deal with high sedentary time that cannot be avoided by consuming more than 150–300 minutes of MVPA each week.

Conclusion

Dr. Sagelv said that going above and beyond 22 minutes a day is the best part. It doesn’t seem to have an upper limit at which it stops being beneficial to health. The risk decrease does, however, seem to level off at the higher ends, roughly 60–120 minutes per day, especially for people who are extremely sedentary.

It’s also not necessary for people to engage in 22 minutes of action all at once every day, as per Dr. Zaslow and earlier studies. Taking ten or fifteen minutes here and there to engage in “exercise snacking” may be a more manageable task for individuals with hectic schedules.

When considering public health, it’s critical to keep in mind that taking any MVPA is preferable to taking none at all. It is preferable to exert a bit extra effort even if the goal is not met.

By Parvathy Sukumaran

Parvathy Sukumaran is a Content Creator and Editor at JustCare Health. She is an Educator and a Language Lecturer. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in Education and an M.A in English Literature. She is passionate about writing, archaeology, music and cooking.

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