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Wed. Apr 24th, 2024

A recent study linked the Covid vaccination from AstraZeneca to a 30% increased risk of a rare blood clotting disorder

Over 10 million people from France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK were examined in the study.

AstraZeneca’s nasal Covid vaccination is 30% more likely than Pfizer’s to cause rare blood clot problems, according to a significant international study that was published in BMJ.

After it was discovered that, in a small number of cases, thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) could be a potential side effect due to the use of the adenovirus sector or a “engineered” virus used by AstraZeneca or Johnson & Johnson, several nations around the world have already changed the vision of the Covid vaccine. Low platelet levels cause life-threatening blood clots to develop in TTS patients.

Over 10 million people from France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK were examined in the study.

Data from about 1.3 million recipients of the first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccination and 2.1 million recipients of the Pfizer vaccine were compared in the first test.

Following the test, 862 individuals reported “thrombocytopenia” within 28 days of receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine, as opposed to more than 500 who received the Pfizer vaccine. According to AFP, this clearly demonstrated a 30% elevated risk of the uncommon blood disorder. In the event of the second dose for either vaccine, there was no added risk.

The investigation was observational, thus cause and effect couldn’t be established. Additional research is being done. A microbiologist in the UK claimed that only 0.04 percent of vaccines administered in Germany and the UK were associated with the uncommon illness of thrombocytopenia.

The US never approved the AstraZeneca vaccine. It did badly in its initial study because only a few subjects developed antibodies in response to the vaccine, and the immunological responses were also subpar compared to those seen with conventional vaccinations.

By Editor

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